Online Classes and Workshops with Sue

Glaze Mixing Essentials

Learn how to mix your own glazes from scratch and do a Colour Run by testing a base glaze with multiple colourants in this online workshop.

Glaze mixing is a foundational skill that will enhance your creative potential, save you money and increase your understanding of the materials you're working with.

Instant access plus a live Q&A session on Zoom every month for 6 months.

Price: $127 USD

Mastering Glaze Consistency

A 4-week, online program that will teach you how to get the best glaze results possible with your existing glazes, and repeat those results from firing to firing.

Learn my system for measuring specific gravity, flocculating and/or deflocculating your glazes to improve application and fix many glaze flaws like running, crawling, glazes turning out the wrong colour, cloudy clears etc.

Registration has now closed. Will open again later in the year. Stay tuned!

The Art of Glaze Chemistry

Learn how to use glaze calculation software to analyze and adjust your glaze recipes so you can adjust melting temperature, change surfaces between matte, satin and glossy, and fix glaze fit issues like crazing/shivering/dunting.

Explore how base glaze composition affects colourants so you can design the unique glaze palette you've been dreaming about.

This is a 9-week program that takes a deep dive into the science behind how glazes are composed. No previous chemistry knowledge required. Take your understanding of glazes to a new level.

Registration currently closed until Fall 2022.

Free Guide

Do you have these glaze challenges?

  • You don't know how much water to add to your glazes
  • You get different results every firing
  • Your glazes aren't turning out as expected
  • You can't seem to keep your glaze thickness consistent

Grab my FREE GUIDE

You'll start understanding your glaze results better when you measure specific gravity. It just takes a few simple steps to calculate the water content of your glazes and then it's easy to keep them consistent. No more guessing!

Consistent water content = consistent application thickness = consistent results.

Sue’s Ceramics Blog

Articles and videos about clay, glazes and studio tips, written by Sue McLeod

Temperature vs Heatwork – Why We Use Witness Cones

Temperature vs Heatwork – Why We Use Witness Cones

I receive a lot of glaze questions and the first question I generally ask in return is “What did the cones look like?” Knowing whether the kiln was over- or under-fired is important for diagnosing many glaze issues. Sometimes I’m told a kiln temperature in response. But…

How to Add Bentonite to a Wet Glaze

How to Add Bentonite to a Wet Glaze

When I was in school and learning to mix my own glazes, I was warned: “Make sure you add bentonite to the DRY materials and mix them together BEFORE you add any water.” It was good advice. The reason for the warning is when bentonite gets wet it swells and gels and…

Are You Mixing Your Glazes Well Enough?

Are You Mixing Your Glazes Well Enough?

Glaze results on the thin side? As a studio technician at a busy pottery studio, it’s my job to mix and maintain 20 different studio glazes. I’m also the one studio users often go to for help when their glazes don’t work out as they had hoped. Every now and then…

Why I Don’t Use a Hydrometer to Measure Specific Gravity

Why I Don’t Use a Hydrometer to Measure Specific Gravity

I didn’t always know about measuring specific gravity. Of the 10 years that I’ve been mixing glazes, I’ve only been measuring specific gravity for 3 of them. It wasn’t a technique I learned in school. But… I had heard about it enough times that eventually I used it to try…

Why I Use a Graduated Cylinder for Measuring Specific Gravity

Why I Use a Graduated Cylinder for Measuring Specific Gravity

I use a graduated cylinder for measuring specific gravity. A slender container is going to have smaller increments than a wide container, giving higher accuracy. You could compare this concept to using a scale with 1g increments vs 5g increments. The smaller measurement is…

How to Measure the Specific Gravity of Your Glazes

How to Measure the Specific Gravity of Your Glazes

In this video I demonstrate how to measure the specific gravity of a glaze I just mixed using a graduated cylinder and a scale. Measuring specific gravity is a way to calculate the water content of a glaze to ensure that each time you glaze, you have the same amount of water…

How to Turn a Matte Glaze Glossy with One Ingredient

How to Turn a Matte Glaze Glossy with One Ingredient

Do you have a matte glaze that you wish was a bit glossier, or would you like a glossy version of one of your matte glazes? It’s really easy to convert a matte glaze to a glossy glaze, just by adding one ingredient…

How to Convert Kaolin to Calcined Kaolin

How to Convert Kaolin to Calcined Kaolin

If you have too much clay in a glaze recipe, you might have issues with your glaze crawling during the firing. Crawling is where the glaze pulls away from the clay body due to a combination of shrinkage, poor adhesion and high surface tension.

Understanding Cone 6 – NCECA presentation 2018

Understanding Cone 6 – NCECA presentation 2018

On Mar 15, 2018 I gave my first ever NCECA talk. I was part of a panel discussion called Glazes Without Borders, moderated by Matt Katz. My co-presenters Kiara Matos and Peter Berg gave talks about...

Start Mixing Your Own Ceramic Glazes – A Shopping List

Start Mixing Your Own Ceramic Glazes – A Shopping List

Are you ready to start mixing your own glazes? Perhaps you’ve reached the point in your ceramics journey that you want to start understanding the materials you’re working with and what is actually happening when you put your pottery into the kiln.

Don’t Skimp on Safety in the Glaze Lab

Don’t Skimp on Safety in the Glaze Lab

Most of our glaze materials come to us in their very basic, unprocessed form.  They are dug out of the ground, impurities may or may not be removed, they are ground into a fine powder, bagged and shipped to our suppliers. Working with these minerals in their raw state poses some health risks.

How to Normalize a Glaze Recipe

How to Normalize a Glaze Recipe

When a recipe adds up to 100%, we can easily compare it to other recipes.  This is particularly useful when we have additions like colourants and opacifiers.  The base recipe remains constant while the additions are always relative to 100%. It also allows us to look at 2 recipes side by side and compare the amounts of individual materials. But what do we do if our recipe doesn’t add up to 100%?

Publications

Technofile: Air Bubble Myth

Published in Ceramics Monthly – Apr 2021

Click here to download this article and join my newsletter.

Originally published in April 2021 issue of Ceramics Monthly, pages 54-55. http://www.ceramicsmonthly.org. Copyright, The American Ceramic Society. Reprinted with permission.

Tips and Tools: The Kiln Sitter

Published in Ceramics Monthly – Nov 2020

Click here to download this article and join my newsletter.

Originally published in Nov 2020 issue of Ceramics Monthly, pages 60-61. http://www.ceramicsmonthly.org. Copyright, The American Ceramic Society. Reprinted with permission.

Technofile: Hard Panned Glazes

Published in Ceramics Monthly – Oct 2020

Click here to download this article and join my newsletter.

Originally published in March 2020 issue of Ceramics Monthly, pages 90-91. http://www.ceramicsmonthly.org. Copyright, The American Ceramic Society. Reprinted with permission.

Technofile: Bentonite

Published in Ceramics Monthly – March 2020

Click here to download this article and join my newsletter.

Originally published in March 2020 issue of Ceramics Monthly, pages 62-63. http://www.ceramicsmonthly.org. Copyright, The American Ceramic Society. Reprinted with permission.

teapot by Sue McLeod
500 teapots volume 2 cover

“O La Fuente”

by Sue McLeod

Published in 500 Teapots – Volume 2

Page 257

"Understanding Cone 6" - Pittsburgh 2018

My NCECA presentation Understanding Cone 6 is all about using glaze chemistry, the Unity Molecular Formula and the Stull chart to understand how different surfaces are created at cone 6.

Which glaze formulas are likely to be matte or glossy? Which ones are likely to be crazed or be under-fired? How does flux ratio impact fired results?

Click here to read or watch/listen to this presentation on my website.

Understanding Cone 6 presentation slides and script are also available as a free download!