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  • You don't know how much water to add to your glazes
  • You get different results every firing
  • Your glazes aren't turning out as expected
  • You can't seem to keep your glaze thickness consistent

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Understanding Glazes and Studio Tips

Articles written by Sue McLeod, a studio technician and glaze explorer

Do You Put Witness Cones in Every Firing?

Do You Put Witness Cones in Every Firing?

I receive a lot of glaze questions and the first question I generally ask in return is "What did the cones look like?" This is because knowing whether the kiln was over- or under-fired is important...

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How to Add Bentonite to a Wet Glaze

How to Add Bentonite to a Wet Glaze

  Photos, instructions and a video down below!What is bentonite? Bentonite is a very fine particle clay that’s often used as a suspending agent in glazes. Glazes need clay in them to keep all...

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How Well Are You Mixing Your Glazes?

How Well Are You Mixing Your Glazes?

Glaze results on the thin side? As a studio technician at a busy pottery studio, it’s my job to mix and maintain 20 different studio glazes. I’m also the one studio users often go to for help when...

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Intro to Glazy.org – Video Tutorial

Intro to Glazy.org – Video Tutorial

Recipe sharing Glazy.org is a free ceramic recipe sharing website where users can upload glaze recipes and photos to share with the ceramics community. Intro to Glazy.org If you've never used...

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How to Convert Kaolin to Calcined Kaolin

How to Convert Kaolin to Calcined Kaolin

If you have too much clay in a glaze recipe, you might have issues with your glaze crawling during the firing. Crawling is where the glaze pulls away from the clay body due to a combination of shrinkage, poor adhesion and high surface tension.

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"Understanding Cone 6"

NCECA presentation - Pittsburgh 2018

My NCECA presentation "Understanding Cone 6" is all about using glaze chemistry, the Unity Molecular Formula and the Stull chart to understand how different surfaces are created at cone 6. Which glaze formulas are likely to be matte or glossy? Which ones are likely to be crazed or be under-fired? How does flux ratio impact fired results?

"Understanding Cone 6" presentation slides and script are available as a free download!

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